Tuesday, February 24, 2015

“The prospect of getting into a scrape didn’t worry them. Not at all. They welcomed it. They were predators, heavy metal avengers, unstoppable, invincible. The feeling was, after six weeks of diddling around they were finally going in to kick some serious Somali a**” - Page 6

In the first half of the book “Black Hawk Down” by Mark Bowden, the setting is Mogadishu, Somalia in 1993. A Somalian warlord named Mohamed Farrah Aidid, is keeping food from the citizens of Somalia by capturing imports. Where “Black Hawk Down” comes in, is when the Army Rangers and Delta Force go in to capture Aidid and his men. Most of the soldiers assigned to this mission were not expecting it to turn out like it did. They had been after Aidid and his men for a good six weeks and were yet to find any real information. Once information showed up about a day meeting between Aidid and some of his higher ups, the Rangers and the Delta Force jumped on the opportunity to capture them. Little did they know that the Somalians saw them coming.
One of the main characters in this book is Sergeant Eversmann. He is commanding one of the chalks in the mission. He is a young Sergeant who is getting his first chance to be a leader as an  Army Ranger and is nervous about it. Right away, he has to deal with a rough situation when one of his men misses the rope while going to the ground and falls 70 feet. Towards the end of the first half he takes command of his chalk and finds his inner leadership.

I can’t really relate to this book besides the fact that I like to read about how our brave men and women overseas are sacrificing their lives to protect us even though we may not deserve it. Some of the things that these brave soldiers do are insane but not at the same time. To the naked eye, it is all insane. The thought of war and everything that goes along with it. However, when examined closer, it is easier to see why these heroes do what they do. It is because of the people that they fight for and the people that they fight alongside with. This may not be the case for every man and woman who fights for our country, but it doesn’t matter. What they are doing for us is what matters. I have the utmost respect for all of the brave people protecting the land of the free and the home of the brave.

Reading the first half of this book has been a joy. I am usually not one to enjoy reading, but this book has intrigued me. I am very excited to start on the second half of “Black Hawk Down” by Mark Bowden. I recommend this book to anybody looking to experience the details of war and all that goes into it. As well to the people that wish to learn about more operations that U.S. soldiers do.

8 comments:

  1. You did a great job of pointing out important details specifically from the book. Next time, do not use the word "it" anywhere in your blog. You used the word "it" quite often in this blog.

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  3. I like how you added your thoughts to the end of the paragraph. One thing is to try and relate somehow to this book. Anything you can, try to relate. If the guy is a main character, you can relate that you're a guy and go from there.

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  4. I think you did a good job of analyzing the general idea of war and why we do that. It made me think about my own opinions as I read your blog. One suggestion I would make is to talk briefly about an intense moment in the book to get the people reading your blog hooked so they might want to read this book.

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  5. Good summary of the book and good job at giving some of your own thoughts and analysis. One thing you could do is maybe try tying the quotation into the book blog a little more.

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  6. I think your second to last paragraph was very good and strong. You could have given some specific examples about what happened in the book like a dangerous situation.

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  7. Downright excellent book, ties in with my current book. You really captured the determination these men posess. Could have been longer but dont fret. Good job Mason.

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  8. "Some of the things that these brave soldiers do are insane but not at the same time." Can you expand on this statement with specific examples? Have you seen the movie? If so, how do the book and the movie compare? Why didn't they know the Somalis saw them?

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